Browse Content     Peter Pan

One night, Peter Pan flies into the home of the Darling children, and so begins a magical adventure with Peter, Wendy, Tinker Bell, and the evil Captain Hook. 

Below are some reading passages that we have hand picked to supplement this book. Be sure to read the passage summaries and our suggestions for instructional use.

5th Grade Poem
Growing Down
Shel Silverstein 2011
Passage Summary:

In Shel Silverstein's poem "Growing Down," a speaker encourages a grown up in their town to try "growing down."

When and How to Pair:

Read this poem after chapter three, “Come Away, Come Away!” to have students discuss character traits. In this chapter, Wendy, John, and Michael meet Peter Pan. Have students discuss what they have learned about Peter Pan so far. Then, have students discuss how Grow-Up Brown changes in “Growing Down.” Have students compare Peter Pan to Grow-Up Brown. Ask, “How are Grow-Up Brown’s actions in ‘Growing Down’ similar to Peter Pan’s? How would you describe the two characters?” Students should give examples of the characters’ sense of fun and imagination.

4th Grade Fiction 1060L
Arriving at Emerald City
L. Frank Baum 1900
Passage Summary:

In this excerpt from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy and her friends arrive at the Emerald City where they plan to meet Oz.

When and How to Pair:

Read this text after chapter five, “The Island Come True,” to have students analyze authors’ craft. In this chapter, Peter Pan and the Darling children arrive in Neverland. Have students discuss the details the authors use to describe the magic of Emerald City in “Arriving at Emerald City” and Neverland. Then, have students analyze the authors’ word choice. Ask, “What words and phrases does the author use to create a sense of wonder in this chapter and in ‘Arriving at Emerald City?’ How do these words and phrases help you visualize Neverland and Emerald City?” Students should give specific examples from both texts. 

4th Grade Short Story 780L
Act Your Age
Colleen Archer 2015
Passage Summary:

In Colleen Archer's story "Act Your Age," a young girl is repeatedly reminded to act her age.

When and How to Pair:

Read this short story after chapter six, “The Little House,” to have students compare and contrast characters. In this chapter, Wendy begins to act as a mother to the Lost Boys. Have students discuss Wendy’s feelings and actions. Then, have students discuss Frances’s feelings and actions in “Act Your Age.”  Have students compare and contrast Wendy and Frances. Ask, “How are Frances’s feelings and actions in ‘Act Your Age’ similar to and different from Wendy’s feelings and actions in this chapter? What do these feelings and actions reveal about the two characters?” Students should draw on themes of childhood and motherhood when describing the two characters. 

5th Grade Short Story 750L
Into the Rapids
Bradford H. Robie 2016
Passage Summary:

In Bradford H. Robie's "Into the Rapids," a boy falls into the river during a rafting trip.

When and How to Pair:

Read this text after chapter eight, “The Mermaids’ Lagoon,” to have students compare and contrast characters. In this chapter, Peter Pan and the Lost Boys fight Captain Hook and his crew. Have students discuss how Peter Pan acts during the confrontation with Captain Hook and when he and Wendy are stranded on the rock. Then, have students discuss how Wyatt reacts to falling in the water in “Into the Rapids.” Have students compare and contrast how Peter Pan and Wyatt react to dangerous situations. Ask, “How do Wyatt from ‘Into the Rapids’ and Peter Pan act similarly and differently in the face of danger? What do these actions reveal about the characters?” Students should describe the ways the characters’ fear and bravery impact their choices.

4th Grade Short Story
The Tides of Change
Victoria Marie Lees 2020
Passage Summary:

In the story "The Tides of Change," two sisters learn the importance of helping others.

When and How to Pair:

Read this text after chapter sixteen, “The Return Home,” to analyze characters’ motivations. In this chapter, Wendy, John, and Michael return home to their parents. Have students discuss why Peter Pan wants to close the window but ultimately decides to leave it open. Then, have students discuss how Marie’s feelings develop over the course of “The Tides of Change.” Have students compare the two characters’ motivations. Ask, “How are Marie’s feelings in ‘The Tides of Change’ similar to and different from Peter Pan’s feelings in this chapter? Why do the two characters make very different decisions?” Students should provide evidence about both characters’ thoughts and actions. 

5th Grade Poem
The Clock Man
Shel Silverstein 2011
Passage Summary:

In Shel Silverstein's poem "The Clock Man," a child is questioned about how much he would pay for more time.

When and How to Pair:

Read this poem after finishing Peter Pan to discuss the theme of time. Have students discuss the differences between Peter Pan and Wendy at the end of the story. Then, have students discuss the child’s feelings about time as he gets older in “The Clock Man.” Have students consider the theme of time in both texts. Ask, “How are Wendy’s and Peter’s perceptions of time different at the end of the story? How is the child’s thinking in ‘The Clock Man’ similar to Peter Pan’s thinking and why? How is the adult’s thinking in ‘The Clock Man’ similar to Wendy’s thinking and why?” Students should explain how the characters in the novel and the poem change to support their thinking about the theme.